Tips for Men on Staying Healthy and Living Longer

When it comes to men’s health, there is a lot that men aren’t talking about around the water cooler at work or while watching a football game.

Men's Health

When it comes to men’s health, there is a lot that men aren’t talking about around the water cooler at work or while watching a football game. Let’s face it, most men aren’t comfortable sharing information about their health concerns. We get it. Granted, there are plenty of ad campaigns with information on conditions such as back pain, joint pain, and erectile dysfunction. Sometimes, it’s the day-to-day things, however, that men need to know about so they can stay healthy and live longer. The physicians at Bluestem Health in Lincoln, Nebraska understand the importance of staying healthy.

See your Primary Care Doctor

Most men are less likely to go to the doctor and, as a result, are more likely to have a serious medical condition when they do. Having a primary care doctor is one way to ensure you are staying current on things like preventive screenings and immunizations. Getting an annual exam will help catch health conditions at an early stage when it is easier to treat them. In addition, regular visits with your doctor allow better monitoring of your overall health and provide opportunities for you to ask questions about concerns you may have.

Here are some other things you can do now to help maintain good Men’s health.

Eat a Healthy Diet

Your body and lifestyle play a big role in what you eat. Use the following information as a basic guide for your daily source of foods:

  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Lean protein such as chicken, fish, and beans
  • Plenty of water (on average, a gallon a day)
  • Limited fats and processed foods

The more active you are, the more calories you burn. Maintaining a healthful diet doesn’t mean you have to give up the foods you enjoy, just eat them in moderation. A balanced diet that is nutritionally rich can go a long way in reducing the risk for heart disease, diabetes, cancer, stroke, and other health conditions.

Have an Active Lifestyle

An active life doesn’t mean you have to be running marathons on the weekends or working out in the gym every day. Activity can range from walking outside to engaging in activities such as sports, swimming, or practicing yoga. It’s more about moving and not sitting on the couch watching TV or being on your computer/phone for hours.

Try incorporating these activities into your weekly routine.

  • 30 minutes of exercise daily
  • Strength training (weight lifting, yoga, push ups)
  • Aerobics (running, walking, dancing)

Reduce Alcohol

Men have a higher rate of alcohol consumption. The CDC recommends men have no more than two drinks or less daily.

Stop Tobacco Use

Whether it’s smoking cigarettes or chewing tobacco, they both have negative effects on your health. Avoiding tobacco products will lower your health risks for heart disease, cancer, and other chronic diseases.

Focus on Your Overall Well-being

Your mental health is equally as important as keeping your body in good health. Getting the recommended hours of sleep each night, managing stress, and engaging with friends socially are just a few ways to help maintain good mental health.

When it comes to Men’s health, our doctors at Bluestem Health will help keep you on track through all stages of your life. If you don’t have a primary care physician, give us a call at 402-476-1455 or visit us at bluestemlincoln.com.

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